NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Elizabeth Wrigley-Field

Department of Sociology, University of Minnesota,
909 Social Sciences Building
267 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
USA

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org
Institutional Affiliation: University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

NBER Working Papers and Publications

December 2018Regional and Racial Inequality in Infectious Disease Mortality in U.S. Cities, 1900-1948
with James J. Feigenbaum, Christopher Muller: w25345
In the first half of the twentieth century, the rate of death from infectious disease in the United States fell precipitously. Although this decline is well-known and well-documented, there is surprisingly little evidence about whether it took place uniformly across the regions of the U.S. We use data on infectious disease deaths from all reporting U.S. cities to describe regional patterns in the decline of urban infectious mortality from 1900 to 1948. We report three main results: First, urban infectious mortality was higher in the South in every year from 1900 to 1948. Second, infectious mortality declined later in southern cities than in cities in the other regions. Third, comparatively high infectious mortality in southern cities was driven primarily by extremely high infectious mortal...

Published: James J. Feigenbaum & Christopher Muller & Elizabeth Wrigley-Field, 2019. "Regional and Racial Inequality in Infectious Disease Mortality in U.S. Cities, 1900–1948," Demography, vol 56(4), pages 1371-1388. citation courtesy of

 
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